New Research In Precipitation Formation From Orographic Cloud Seeding:

PNAS | By: Various Authors | GPE – February 27, 2018: Throughout the western United States and other semiarid mountainous regions across the globe, water supplies are fed primarily through the melting of snowpack. Growing populations place higher demands on water, while warmer winters and earlier springs reduce its supply. Water managers are tantalized by the prospect of cloud seeding…

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Solar Roof Tiles From Dutch Company Exasun Look Slick:

Clean Technica | By: Zachary Shahan | February 25th, 2018: A Tesla copycat? Certainly not — Exasun was in the solar roof tile business before Tesla. It also has what seems to be a cost-competitive, attractive, high-quality product on offer. I visited the company’s headquarters and factory in Amsterdam last year during a cleantech tour Remco van der Horst arranged…

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What The Hospitals Of The Future Look Like:

The Wall Street Journal | By: Laura Landro | February 25, 2018: The sprawling institutions we know are radically changing—becoming smaller, more digital, or disappearing completely. The result should be cheaper and better care. In a shift away from their traditional inpatient facilities, health-care providers are investing in outpatient clinics, same-day surgery centers, free-standing emergency rooms and microhospitals, which offer…

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Public Split On Basic Income For Workers Replaced By Robots:

Gallup | By: RJ Reinhart | February 26, 2018: Americans are split in their support for a hypothetical universal basic income (UBI) program that would guarantee a minimum income for workers who lose their jobs because of advances in artificial intelligence (AI). Forty-eight percent support and 52% oppose a UBI program for workers who are displaced by technology. 48% of…

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World Bank Sanctions Healthcare Group For Hiding Agent Commissions:

The FCPA Blog | By: Richard L. Cassin | February 23, 2018: The World Bank Friday debarred two related healthcare companies for misrepresenting the amount of commissions one of them agreed to pay an agent under projects in Bangladesh. The 18-month debarments were imposed on ConvaTec International Services GmbH, based in Switzerland, and ConvaTec Malaysia Sdn Bhd, based in Malaysia.…

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Jakarta, The World’s Fastest-Sinking City, Also Faces Rising Sea Levels And River Pollution:

Circle Of Blue | By: Kayla Ritter | February 23, 2018: Certain parts of the city have sunk 14 feet in recent decades, largely due to illegal well-digging. The Rundown Jakarta, Indonesia, is sinking faster than any city in the world–so fast, in fact, that certain coastal areas have descended 14 feet in recent years. One cause is Illegal well-digging,…

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The Secret Of Israel’s Water Miracle And How It Can Help A Thirsty World:

Haaretz | By: Ruth Schuster | GPE – February 22, 2018: India for one is encouraging drip’s adoption through subsidies, says author Seth Siegel. Originally published July 04, 2017: Drip irrigation is a technology invented by a former Israeli government official, Simcha Blass. The rights were acquired by the Israeli company Netafim, which is marketing the irrigation solution – which…

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How Israel Became A Leader In Water Use In The Middle East:

PBS News Hour | By: Martin Fletcher | GPE – February 22, 2018: Over the past few years in Israel, the country’s water shortage has become a surplus. Originally published on April 26, 2015: Through a combination of conservation, reuse and desalination, the country now has more water than it needs. And that could translate to political progress for the…

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Cape Town May Dry Up Because Of An Aversion To Israel:

The Wall Street Journal | By: Seth M. Siegel | February 21, 2018: The Palestinian Authority accepts the Jewish state’s help on water projects. South Africa refuses it. Cape Town, South Africa, has designated July 9 “Day Zero.” That’s when water taps throughout the city are expected to go dry, marking the culmination of a three-year drought. South African officials…

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Both Sides Of The Aisle Want Better Roads And Ports:

The Wall Street Journal | By: James Inhofe & Sheldon Whitehouse | February 21, 2018: Conservative Republicans and progressive Democrats can find common ground on infrastructure. During his State of the Union address, President Trump called for a broad bipartisan infrastructure package, pledging to improve the nation’s infrastructure and invest in the future. If you believe the news reports on…

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Blockchain Could Change Everything For Energy:

Renewable Energy World | By: Patrick Maloney | GPE – February 21, 2018: Scientists have observed that the electricity sector contributes to 35 percent of the carbon emissions in the U.S. every year. And as climate news piles up, there is a growing movement among ordinary people to do something. Originally published February 16, 2018: But historically, we’ve had a…

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Cape Town Is Running Out Of Water. Is Los Angeles next?

Curbed – Los Angeles | By: Marissa Clifford | GPE – February 20, 2018: Water-scarce Los Angeles should be a global example of sustainability—but it’s not quite there yet. Originally published February 06, 2018: There’s an expression in Afrikaans, n boer maak a plan, which roughly translates to “a farmer makes a plan.” According to Carey Buchanan, a lapsed Afrikaner…

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Water Is Connected To Every Major Global Risk We Face:

Pacific Institute | By: Cora Kammeyer | GPE – February 20, 2018: Water crises have been among the top five global risks in each of the last seven years, according to the World Economic Forum (WEF). This year is no exception. ‘Water Crises’ is listed as the fifth-most impactful risk for 2018. In addition to being a major risk in…

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We Have Seen The Future Of Water, And It Is Cape Town:

The Huffington Post | By: Peter H. Gleick | GPE – February 20, 2018: Cape Town is parched. Severe drought and high water use have collided in South Africa’s second largest city, and unless the drought breaks, residents may run out of water in the next few months when there simply isn’t enough water left to supply the drinking water…

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Graphene Membrane Enables Single-Step Water Purification:

Sustainability Matters | Dr. Dong Han Seo | February 19, 2018: CSIRO scientists have used their own specially designed form of graphene to make water purification simpler, more effective and quicker. Published in the journal Nature Communications, their breakthrough potentially solves one of the great problems with current water filtering methods: fouling. Over time, chemical- and oil-based pollutants coat and…

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Exploring ~ China:

Explore Documentary Films | GPE – February 19, 2018: “Media always focuses on the negative aspects of China but what it fails to mention is that there are many heroic selfless leaders who are dedicated to improving the human condition. To this day, I remember my talks with the young environmentalist, Wen Bo.” Discover China’s many hidden gems: philosophy, art,…

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Rooftop Solar Lowers Peak Electricity Demand In Australian Heatwave:

Clean Technica | By: Giles Parkinson | February 17, 2018: Households and businesses played a key role in reducing peak demand and capping wholesale electricity costs in South Australia last month, with data showing that rooftop solar played a major role in reducing and deferring demand peaks in the midst of the heatwave. Solar Citizens states that rooftop solar was…

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Mix Of Solar And Batteries Is Beating Natural Gas:

Renewable Energy World | By: Chris Martin & Mark Chediak | GPE – February 17, 2018: Natural gas is getting edged out of power markets across the U.S. by two energy sources that, together, are proving to be an unbeatable mix: solar and batteries. Originally published February 13, 2018: In just the latest example, First Solar Inc. won a power…

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West Coast Developer Used Real-Estate Wealth To Support Medical Research:

The Wall Street Journal | By: Austen Hufford | February 16, 2018: Sanford Diller was known for design-focused approach to developing rental apartment buildings in Bay Area. When Sanford Diller had an idea for a real-estate project or philanthropic initiative, he would spell them out in long, detailed voicemail messages to family members and employees. With his wife, Helen Diller,…

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Retired Executive Gave Up Golf To Create A Free Medical Clinic At Hilton Head, South Carolina:

The Wall Street Journal | By: James R. Hagerty | February 16, 2018: Jack McConnell recruited retired nurses, doctors and dentists to care for the uninsured. Golf was on the agenda when Jack McConnell retired to Hilton Head, S.C., in 1989. Then the former Johnson & Johnson executive found a different distraction. In his chats with landscapers, waiters and others…

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