Up To The Last Drop ~ The Secret Water War In Europe:

Al Jazeera | By: Yorgos Avgeropoulos | April 16, 2018: Is water a commodity or a human right? Cities across Europe are fighting water privatisation. In 2010, water was officially recognised as a universal human right by the United Nations. However, the European Union has yet to do the same. The management of water has long been in the hands…

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Kongjian Yu ~ Big Feet Revolution:

UrbanNext | GPE – March 22, 2018: In this short film, which is an excerpt of an interview produced during the symposium “Decoding Asian Urbanism” held at the South Asian Institute at Harvard University, landscape architect Kongjian Yu talks about how ecological lifestyles demand for a new set of aesthetic values. For more videos from urbanNext on Vimeo – please…

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Turning Cities Into Sponges ~ How Chinese Ancient Wisdom Is Taking On Climate Change:

The Guardian | By: Brigid Delaney | March 21, 2018: Landscape architect Kongjian Yu is making ‘friends with water’ to mitigate extreme weather events in modern metropolises. How does a city cope with extreme weather? These days, urban planning that doesn’t factor in some sort of catastrophic weather event is like trying to build something in a fictional utopia. For…

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Fourth Wave Environmentalism Fully Embraces Business:

The Wall Street Journal | By: Fred Krupp | March 20, 2018: Multilateral corporate partnerships and market-based approaches have become standard practice. American corporations began joining with environmental groups to increase sustainability nearly 30 years ago. This trend was still on the horizon in 1986 when I wrote an op-ed for this page describing an emerging style of environmentalism dedicated…

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A Bold Plan For The World’s Tallest Wooden Skyscraper In Tokyo:

Clean Technica | By: The Beam | March 15, 2018: Sumitomo Forestry Co. recently released a plan to build the tallest wooden high-rise in the world. At a height of 350 meters and comprised of 90% wood, the building has been dubbed the W350. The architectural designs feature plentiful greenery and aim to create a sense of biodiversity in an…

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WHO Launches Health Review After Microplastics Found In 90% Of Bottled Water:

The Guardian | By: Graham Readfearn | March 16, 2018: Researchers find levels of plastic fibres in popular bottled water brands could be twice as high as those found in tap water. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has announced a review into the potential risks of plastic in drinking water after a new analysis of some of the world’s most…

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Solar-Plus-Storage Makes Tangible Difference In Puerto Rico Recovery Efforts:

Renewable Energy World | By: Jennifer Delony | GPE – March 16, 2018: With a reported 150,000 homes and businesses in Puerto Rico still waiting for electricity since it was lost six month ago during Hurricanes Irma and Maria, small successes with solar-plus-storage installations are making a big difference in ongoing recovery efforts. Originally published March 9, 2018: Hawaii-based Blue…

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Why Is Africa Building A Great Green Wall?

BBC | By: Amelia Martyn-Hemphill | GPE – March 16, 2018: Eleven countries are planting a wall of trees from east to west across Africa, just under the southern edge of the Sahara desert. The goal is to fight the effects of climate change by reversing desertification. A film by Amelia Martyn-Hemphill for BBC World Hacks – Originally published September…

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Starting School At 10am Halves Student Illness And Improves Academic Performance, Finds Study:

The Independent | By: Josh Gabbatiss | GPE – March 14, 2018: Teenagers require more sleep than adults, and this should be taken into consideration when setting school start times. Originally published November 27, 2017: A new study has shown delaying school start times for teenagers can have major benefits, including better academic performance and improved mental and physical health.…

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What The Hospitals Of The Future Look Like:

The Wall Street Journal | By: Laura Landro | February 25, 2018: The sprawling institutions we know are radically changing—becoming smaller, more digital, or disappearing completely. The result should be cheaper and better care. In a shift away from their traditional inpatient facilities, health-care providers are investing in outpatient clinics, same-day surgery centers, free-standing emergency rooms and microhospitals, which offer…

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The Secret Of Israel’s Water Miracle And How It Can Help A Thirsty World:

Haaretz | By: Ruth Schuster | GPE – February 22, 2018: India for one is encouraging drip’s adoption through subsidies, says author Seth Siegel. Originally published July 04, 2017: Drip irrigation is a technology invented by a former Israeli government official, Simcha Blass. The rights were acquired by the Israeli company Netafim, which is marketing the irrigation solution – which…

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How Israel Became A Leader In Water Use In The Middle East:

PBS News Hour | By: Martin Fletcher | GPE – February 22, 2018: Over the past few years in Israel, the country’s water shortage has become a surplus. Originally published on April 26, 2015: Through a combination of conservation, reuse and desalination, the country now has more water than it needs. And that could translate to political progress for the…

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Cape Town May Dry Up Because Of An Aversion To Israel:

The Wall Street Journal | By: Seth M. Siegel | February 21, 2018: The Palestinian Authority accepts the Jewish state’s help on water projects. South Africa refuses it. Cape Town, South Africa, has designated July 9 “Day Zero.” That’s when water taps throughout the city are expected to go dry, marking the culmination of a three-year drought. South African officials…

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Blockchain Could Change Everything For Energy:

Renewable Energy World | By: Patrick Maloney | GPE – February 21, 2018: Scientists have observed that the electricity sector contributes to 35 percent of the carbon emissions in the U.S. every year. And as climate news piles up, there is a growing movement among ordinary people to do something. Originally published February 16, 2018: But historically, we’ve had a…

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Graphene Membrane Enables Single-Step Water Purification:

Sustainability Matters | Dr. Dong Han Seo | February 19, 2018: CSIRO scientists have used their own specially designed form of graphene to make water purification simpler, more effective and quicker. Published in the journal Nature Communications, their breakthrough potentially solves one of the great problems with current water filtering methods: fouling. Over time, chemical- and oil-based pollutants coat and…

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Retired Executive Gave Up Golf To Create A Free Medical Clinic At Hilton Head, South Carolina:

The Wall Street Journal | By: James R. Hagerty | February 16, 2018: Jack McConnell recruited retired nurses, doctors and dentists to care for the uninsured. Golf was on the agenda when Jack McConnell retired to Hilton Head, S.C., in 1989. Then the former Johnson & Johnson executive found a different distraction. In his chats with landscapers, waiters and others…

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China’s Insurers Try Novel Approach To Elderly Care ~ Building Retirement Homes:

The Wall Street Journal | By: Chuin-Wei Yap | February 14, 2018: Industry has spent more than $10 billion building retirement communities to address aging population’s needs. About an hour’s drive from downtown Shanghai sits a resort-like community housing hundreds of senior citizens. It is an ambitious experiment in retirement care in China. The multistory complex, which can house up…

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Mission-Control-Like Command Center At This Hospital Is Taking Healthcare Into The Future:

GE Reports | By: Michelle Sweetwood | GPE – February 14, 2018: In the 1960s, airports started using air traffic control technology that allowed them to swiftly transition from scheduling a few hundred flights a day to managing thousands. Now, many airports handle millions of passengers every day. Despite the vast complexity of such a logistical challenge, the airline industry…

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Business Interest In Blockchain Picks Up While Cryptocurrency Causes Conniptions:

The Wall Street Journal | By: Kim S. Nash | February 06, 2018: Companies that move products and people through complex supply chains see promise in the technology. During Walmart’s test of blockchain traceability, a Walmart associate could check mangoes on the shelf or in the backroom and trace it back to the farm with the retailer’s smart app. Blockchain…

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